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Bluestar Linux - Overview

 

Bluestar is a GNU/Linux operating system, built to provide the following features:

 

  • Up-to-date Kernel version - 4.8.x
  • Fast (optimized for performance)
  • Wide Variety of Applications - Always Current Versions
  • Full Development / Desktop / Multimedia Environment
  • Arch Linux Based Distribution
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    Installing As A Non-Root User
    Submitted By: admin Date: May 11, 2013, 01:42:11 AM Views: 1837

    First of all, I have to admit that I made an initial assumption that users would perform installations using a KDM root login, but it has been brought to my attention that my assumption was perhaps a bad one. In response, I've modified the installer's menu file to call it via ssx which, if run by a non-root user, will force root authentication before running the program. This change will be in effect from the next Base edition releases onward.

    For those who are currently having problems with your installation, the installer script is /usr/bin/bslxinstall, and you can either log on as root and run it from the menu, or run it via sudo on the command line.

    Code: [Select]
    sudo /usr/bin/bslxinstall
    You will be presented with an authentication dialog if you run it from the command line. The current sudo configuration is set up to expect the user's own password, not the root password, to be entered into the dialog. This is sudo's default behaviour. This is also a problem since the authentication dialog won't accept a blank password and the default bslx user has no password. In this case, you can either set a temporary password (enter passwd at the command line and give yourself a password) or, if you would prefer that sudo authentication uses the target user's password, this can be configured in the /etc/sudoers file by uncommenting the line that reads:

    Code: [Select]
    Defaults targetpw
    Understand that any changes made during a live media session are temporary and will be gone the next time you boot/reboot.

    I intend to change the default behaviour to expect the target user's password in future releases.

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