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Bluestar is a GNU/Linux operating system, built to provide the following features:

 

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    Atom Dual-Core + Intel GMA3600 Graphics Resolution Issue
    Submitted By: admin Date: March 06, 2013, 02:40:17 PM Views: 3281
    Summary: A solution.

    Anyone who owns an Intel Atom D2500/N2600 system with a GMA3600 graphics chipset is probably getting tired of 800x600 resolution and/or banging their heads against a wall waiting for a solution from Intel.

    After exhaustive research, I've found that there really is no viable kernel-based solution - yet. The newest Linux kernels now include a gma500_gfx driver that is supposed to provide native resolution for the GMA3600 when using the modesetting xorg driver... but it doesn't, at least not in all cases.

    The next round of Bluestar Linux releases will include 2 new packages, v86d and 915resolution. These can be used in tandem to deliver 1024x600 resolution.

    Instructions

    If you are using a non-Bluestar, Arch Linux distribution and arrived here to find out how to configure uvesafb/v86d and 915resolution, please make sure you've installed v86d (pacman -S v86d) and downloaded and installed 915resolution-static (pacman -U 915resolution-static-0.5.3-9-i686.pkg.tar.xz or ...x86_64.pkg.tar.xz) which you can find here under Downloads->Bluestar Linux->Miscellaneous->Packages->915resolution-static.

    You will need to edit 4 files:

    1. /usr/lib/initcpio/install/v86d

    Open this file with your favourite text editor and edit the line that starts with "add_file".

    It should read:

        add_file "/etc/modprobe.d/uvesafb.conf"

    Save the file.

    2. /etc/modprobe.d/uvesafb.conf

    If this file doesn't exist, copy it to /etc/modprobe.d from /usr/lib/modprobe.d/uvesafb.conf:

        cp /usr/lib/modprobe.d/uvesafb.conf /etc/modprobe.d

    Open this file with your favourite editor and find the "options" line

        options uvesafb mode_option=1024x600-32 scroll=ywrap

    Change the resolution to what you expect/want (it must be a resolution that your monitor can handle).
    Save the file.


    Note re mtrr:

    Quote
    mtrr:n  Setup memory type range registers for the framebuffer
            where n:
                  0 - disabled (equivalent to nomtrr) (default)
                  1 - uncachable
                  2 - write-back
                  3 - write-combining
                  4 - write-through
            If you see the following in dmesg, choose the type that matches
            the old one.  In this example, use "mtrr:2".
    ...
    mtrr: type mismatch for e0000000,8000000 old: write-back new: write-combining

    Check your dmesg output for mtrr errors (dmesg | grep mtrr). If you see errors like the one mentioned above, add the following to the uvesafb.conf options line:

        mtrr=2

    It should look like this:

        options uvesafb mode_option=1024x600-32 mtrr=2 scroll=ywrap

    Save the file, and make sure to rerun mkinitcpio if you're adding this after the fact. If you're adding this while going through the instructions, don't worry, you'll be running mkinitcpio as the last step.


    3. /usr/lib/initcpio/hooks/915resolution

    Open this file with your favourite text editor and find the following line:

        /usr/sbin/915resolution 54 1024 600

    The last 2 numbers must reflect the same resolution you set up in the first file. So if you wanted 1024x768, these numbers will be 1024 768.

    The other number is a mode code and you must choose one that you won't be needing. To figure this out, run the following on the command line:

        915resolution -l

    You'll get a list like the following:

    Intel 800/900 Series VBIOS Hack : version 0.5.3

    Chipset: 3600GM
    BIOS: TYPE 1
    Mode Table Offset: $C0000 + $268
    Mode Table Entries: 36

    Mode 30 : 640x480, 8 bits/pixel
    Mode 32 : 800x600, 8 bits/pixel
    Mode 34 : 1024x600, 8 bits/pixel
    Mode 38 : 1280x1024, 8 bits/pixel
    Mode 3a : 1600x1200, 8 bits/pixel
    Mode 3c : 1920x1440, 8 bits/pixel
    Mode 41 : 640x480, 16 bits/pixel
    Mode 43 : 800x600, 16 bits/pixel
    Mode 45 : 1024x600, 16 bits/pixel
    Mode 49 : 1280x1024, 16 bits/pixel
    Mode 4b : 1600x1200, 16 bits/pixel
    Mode 4d : 1920x1440, 16 bits/pixel
    Mode 50 : 640x480, 32 bits/pixel
    Mode 52 : 800x600, 32 bits/pixel
    Mode 54 : 1024x600, 32 bits/pixel
    Mode 58 : 1280x1024, 32 bits/pixel
    Mode 5a : 1600x1200, 32 bits/pixel
    Mode 5c : 1920x1440, 32 bits/pixel


    Note the the mode number in the file we're editing represents the 1024x600-32 resolution, in this case. Normally you're likely to see 1024x768 here which might be a resolution you want to use, so choose one you know you'll never use - like perhaps 5c, if you know you'll never use a 1920x1440-32 resolution.

    Plug this number in where the "54" appears in the example above - or use "54" if you're using a netbook that doesn't support a 1024x768-32 resolution.

    Save the file.

    4. /etc/mkinitcpio.conf

    There are 2 lines that will need to be changed in this file.

    Find the line that starts with FILES="".

    Between the double-quotation marks, add

        /etc/modprobe.d/uvesafb.conf

    so now the line reads

    FILES="/etc/modprobe.d/uvesafb.conf"

    Now find the line that reads HOOKS="...".

    This line will have values already. You don't want to change these, but we'll be adding 2 new values

        915resolution v86d

    Add these so that the line reads:

        HOOKS="base udev 915resolution v86d autodetect pata scsi sata filesystems usbinput"

    Now save the file.

    Note to mkarchiso users:

    Since an Arch iso image is booting up against a squashfs file system, and /usr/sbin/915resolution isn't available to it at boot time, you'll also need to add the following:

    BINARIES="/usr/sbin/915resolution"

    Also, it doesn't hurt for anyone to add this to their mkinitcpio.conf file.


    Last Step

    The last step is to recreate the files /boot/initramfs-linux.img and /boot/initramfs-linux-fallback.img.

    At the command line, simply enter:

        mkinitcpio -p linux

    You'll see a lot of output, like this:

    [root@bluestar ~]# mkinitcpio -p linux
    ==> Building image from preset: 'default'
      -> -k /boot/vmlinuz-linux -c /etc/mkinitcpio.conf -g /boot/initramfs-linux.img
    ==> Starting build: 3.7.10-1-ARCH
      -> Running build hook: [base]
      -> Running build hook: [udev]
      -> Running build hook: [915resolution]
      -> Running build hook: [v86d]
      -> Running build hook: [autodetect]
    ==> WARNING: Hook 'pata' is deprecated. Replace it with 'block' in your config
      -> Running build hook: [block]
    ==> WARNING: Hook 'scsi' is deprecated. Replace it with 'block' in your config
      -> Running build hook: [block]
    ==> WARNING: Hook 'sata' is deprecated. Replace it with 'block' in your config
      -> Running build hook: [block]
      -> Running build hook: [filesystems]
    ==> WARNING: Hook 'usbinput' is deprecated. Replace it with 'keyboard' in your config
      -> Running build hook: [keyboard]
    ==> Generating module dependencies
    ==> Creating gzip initcpio image: /boot/initramfs-linux.img
    ==> Image generation successful
    ==> Building image from preset: 'fallback'
      -> -k /boot/vmlinuz-linux -c /etc/mkinitcpio.conf -g /boot/initramfs-linux-fallback.img -S autodetect
    ==> Starting build: 3.7.10-1-ARCH
      -> Running build hook: [base]
      -> Running build hook: [udev]
      -> Running build hook: [915resolution]
      -> Running build hook: [v86d]
    ==> WARNING: Hook 'pata' is deprecated. Replace it with 'block' in your config
      -> Running build hook: [block]
    ==> WARNING: Hook 'scsi' is deprecated. Replace it with 'block' in your config
      -> Running build hook: [block]
    ==> WARNING: Hook 'sata' is deprecated. Replace it with 'block' in your config
      -> Running build hook: [block]
      -> Running build hook: [filesystems]
    ==> WARNING: Hook 'usbinput' is deprecated. Replace it with 'keyboard' in your config
      -> Running build hook: [keyboard]
    ==> Generating module dependencies
    ==> Creating gzip initcpio image: /boot/initramfs-linux-fallback.img
    ==> Image generation successful

    Make sure that 915resolution and v86d are built, and that the last line reads "Image generation successful".

    Reboot, and enjoy.



    Important Note

    After installing v86d, you must modify either the /usr/lib/initcpio/install/v86d file or the /usr/lib/modprobe.d/uvesafb.conf file.

    If you choose to modify the former, make sure it references the correct uvesafb.conf file and that this matches the FILES entry in mkinitcpio.conf.

    If you choose to modify the latter, make sure it reflects the resolution you want.

    By default, /usr/lib/initcpio/install/v86d references /usr/lib/modprobe.d/uvesafb.conf, not /etc/modprobe.d/uvesafb.conf, regardless of your FILES entry in mkinitcpio.conf. Make sure that all of these files line up. If you would prefer to use /etc/modprobe.d/uvesafb.conf, modify /usr/lib/initcpio/install/v86d to reflect this file path.



    For more complete instructions, check out the Arch Wiki article at https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Uvesafb

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